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What is Lossless?

Lossless compression reduces a file's size with no loss of quality. This seemingly magical method of reducing file sizes can be applied to both image and audio files. While JPEGs and MP3s use lossy compression, newer compression algorithms, such as JPEG 2000 and Apple Lossless compression, can be used to create lossless compressed files. Lossless compression basically rewrites the data of the original file in a more efficient way. However, because no quality is lost, the resulting files are typically much larger than image ... Read more

What is MPEG?

Stands for "Moving Picture Experts Group." MPEG is an organization that develops standards for encoding digital audio and video. It works with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to ensure media compression standards are widely adopted and universally available. The MPEG organization has produced a number of digital media standards since its inception in 1998. Examples include: MPEG-1 – Audio/video standards designed for digital storage media (such as an MP3 file)MPEG-2 – Standards for digital television and DVD videoMPEG-4 – Multimedia standards for the computers, mobile devices, and the webMPEG-7 – ... Read more

What is File Compression?

File compression is used to reduce the file size of one or more files. When a file or a group of files is compressed, the resulting "archive" often takes up 50% to 90% less disk space than the original file(s). Common types of file compression include Zip, Gzip, RAR, StuffIt, and 7z compression. Each one of these compression methods uses a unique algorithm to compress the data. So how does a file compression utility actually compress data? While each compression algorithm is different, they all work in a similar fashion. ... Read more

What is MP3?

Stands for "MPEG Audio Layer-3." MP3 is a compressed audio file format developed by the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG). A typical MP3 file sounds similar to the original recording, but requires significantly less disk space. MP3 files are often about one tenth the size of an uncompressed WAVE or AIFF file, which have the same audio quality as a CD. The small file size and high fidelity of MP3 files helped popularize digital music downloads in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Instead of requiring a 40 megabyte download for a single song, the comparable MP3 ... Read more
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