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What is a Hub?

There are two primary types of hubs in the computing world: 1) network hubs and 2) USB hubs. 1. Network hub A network hub is a device that allows multiple computers to communicate with each other over a network. It has several Ethernet ports that are used to connect two or more network devices together. Each computer or device connected to the hub can communicate with any other device connected to one of the hub's Ethernet ports. Hubs are similar to switches, but are not as "smart." While switches ... Read more

What is RJ45?

RJ45 is a type of connector commonly used for Ethernet networking. It looks similar to a telephone jack, but is slightly wider. Since Ethernet cables have an RJ45 connector on each end, Ethernet cables are sometimes also called RJ45 cables. The "RJ" in RJ45 stands for "registered jack," since it is a standardized networking interface. The "45" simply refers to the number of the interface standard. Each RJ45 connector has eight pins, which means an RJ45 cable contains eight separate wires. If you look ... Read more

What is a Cable Modem?

A cable modem is a peripheral device used to connect to the Internet. It operates over coax cable TV lines and provides high-speed Internet access. Since cable modems offer an always-on connection and fast data transfer rates, they are considered broadband devices. Dial-up modems, which were popular in the early years of the Internet, offered speeds close to 56 Kbps over analog telephone lines. Eventually, DSL and cable modems replaced dial-up modems since they offered much faster speeds. Early cable modems provided download and upload speeds of 1 to 3 Mbps, 20 to 60 times faster than the fastest ... Read more

What is 802.11ac?

802.11ac (also called 5G Wi-Fi) is the fifth generation of Wi-Fi technology, standardized by the IEEE. It is an evolution of the previous standard, 802.11n, that provides greater bandwidth and more simultaneous spatial streams. This allows 802.11ac devices to support data transfer rates that are several times faster than those of 802.11n devices. Unlike previous Wi-Fi standards, which operated at a 2.4 GHz frequency, 802.11ac operates exclusively on a 5 GHz frequency band. This prevents interference with common 2.4 GHz devices, such as cordless phones, baby monitors, and older wireless routers. Computers and ... Read more

What is 802.11b?

802.11b is one of several Wi-Fi standards developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). It was released in 1999 along with 802.11a as the first update to the initial 802.11 specification, published in 1997. Both 802.11a and 802.11b are wireless transmission standards for local area networks, but 802.11a uses a 5 GHz frequency, while 802.11b operates on a 2.4 GHz band. The 802.11b Wi-Fi standard provides a wireless range of roughly 35 meters indoors and 140 meters outdoors. It supports transfer rates up to 11 Mbps, or 1.375 megabytes per second. ... Read more

What is Wired Network?

In computing terminology, the term "wired" is used to differentiate between wireless connections and those that involve cables. While wireless devices communicate over the air, a wired setup uses physical cables to transfer data between different devices and computer systems. A wired network is a common type of wired configuration. Most wired networks use Ethernet cables to transfer data between connected PCs. In a small wired network, a single router may be used to connect all the computers. Larger networks often involve multiple routers or switches that connect to each other. One of ... Read more

What is Networking?

A network consists of multiple devices that communicate with one another. It can be as small as two computers or as large as billions of devices. While a traditional network is comprised of desktop computers, modern networks may include laptops, tablets, smartphones, televisions, gaming consoles, smart appliances, and other electronics. Many types of networks exist, but they fall under two primary categories: LANs and WANs. LAN (Local Area Network) A local area network is limited to a specific area, such as a home, office, or campus. A home network may have a single router that ... Read more

What is a Port?

In the computer world, the term "port" has three different meanings. It may refer to 1) a hardware port, 2) an Internet port number, or 3) the process of porting a software program from one platform to another. 1. Hardware Port A hardware port is a physical connection on a computer or another electronic device. Common ports on modern desktop computers include USB, Thunderbolt, Ethernet, and DisplayPort. Previous generations of computers used different ports, such a serial ports, parallel ports, and VGA ports. Mobile devices often have only one port. For example, an iPhone or iPad may have a single Lightning connector. ... Read more

What is a VLAN?

Stands for "Virtual Local Area Network," or "Virtual LAN." A VLAN is a custom network created from one or more existing LANs. It enables groups of devices from multiple networks (both wired and wireless) to be combined into a single logical network. The result is a virtual LAN that can be administered like a physical local area network. In order to create a virtual LAN, the network equipment, such as routers and switches must support VLAN configuration. The hardware is typically configured using a software admin tool that allows the network administrator ... Read more

What is Bandwith?

Bandwidth describes the maximum data transfer rate of a network or Internet connection. It measures how much data can be sent over a specific connection in a given amount of time. For example, a gigabit Ethernet connection has a bandwidth of 1,000 Mbps (125 megabytes per second). An Internet connection via cable modem may provide 25 Mbps of bandwidth. While bandwidth is used to describe network speeds, it does not measure how fast bits of data move from one location to another. Since data packets travel over electronic or fiber optic cables, the speed of each bit ... Read more
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