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What is WAIS?

Stands for "Wide Area Information Server." This is a program that can index enormous amounts of information and make it searchable across large networks (including the Internet). People can search the WAIS index and it will return results by relevance. Searches can then be narrowed down by subsequent searches on the original results. Search engines are a new and improved version of WAIS, specifically for the Web. Read more

What is Gopher?

The Gopher technology was invented at the University of Minnesota, whose mascot is, not surprisingly, the Golden Gopher. The gopher system allows people to search for and retrieve information using a text interface. The technology is based on a client-server structure, where a gopher client program is used to search gopher servers. These servers can store documents, articles, programs, and other information. Instead of hyperlinks, the gopher interface uses menus of links to other documents and programs. The University of Minnesota began ... Read more

What is Telnet?

This is a program that allows you log in to a Unix computer via a text-based interface. If you have an account on a Telnet server, you can access certain resources on the system such your home directory, your e-mail account, FTP files, etc. The downside of Telnet is that, to use it, you need to use Unix commands, which can be a challenge. Read more

What is Newsgroup ?

A newsgroup is an online discussion forum accessible through Usenet. Each newsgroup contains discussions about a specific topic, indicated in the newsgroup name. You can browse newsgroups and post or reply to topics using a newsreader program. Access to newsgroups also requires a Usenet subscription. Most Usenet providers offer monthly access for around $10 USD per month. Newsgroups may be either moderated or unmoderated. In a moderated newsgroup, a moderator must approve posts in order for them to become part of the discussion. ... Read more

HTTP headers :: Origin

The Origin HTTP Header is a response HTTP header that indicates the security contexts that initiates an HTTP request without indicating the path information. The Origin header is added by the browser and can not be controlled by the user. Syntax: Origin: <scheme> "://" <hostname> ":" <port> Directives: <scheme>:<hostname>:<port>: Examples: Origin: null This means that there is no origin for the service requested. Origin: https://www.nettoolkit.net This means that the origin if the service requested exists and has https as the scheme and www.geeksforgeeks.org as the hostname. Supported Browsers The following browsers are compatible ... Read more

What is W3C?

Stands for "World Wide Web Consortium." The W3C is an international community that includes a full-time staff, industry experts, and several member organizations. These groups work together to develop standards for the World Wide Web. The mission of the W3C is to lead the Web to its full potential by developing relevant protocols and guidelines. This is achieved primarily by creating and publishing Web standards. By adopting the Web standards created by the W3C, hardware manufacturers and software developers can ensure their equipment and programs work with the latest ... Read more

What is POP3?

Stands for "Post Office Protocol." POP3, sometimes referred to as just "POP," is a simple, standardized method of delivering e-mail messages. A POP3 mail server receives e-mails and filters them into the appropriate user folders. When a user connects to the mail server to retrieve his mail, the messages are downloaded from mail server to the user's hard disk. When you configure your e-mail client, such as Outlook (Windows) or Mail (Mac OS X), you will need to enter the type of ... Read more

What is a Port?

In the computer world, the term "port" has three different meanings. It may refer to 1) a hardware port, 2) an Internet port number, or 3) the process of porting a software program from one platform to another. 1. Hardware Port A hardware port is a physical connection on a computer or another electronic device. Common ports on modern desktop computers include USB, Thunderbolt, Ethernet, and DisplayPort. Previous generations of computers used different ports, such a serial ports, parallel ports, and VGA ports. Mobile devices often have only one port. For example, an iPhone or iPad may have a single Lightning connector. ... Read more

What is a VLAN?

Stands for "Virtual Local Area Network," or "Virtual LAN." A VLAN is a custom network created from one or more existing LANs. It enables groups of devices from multiple networks (both wired and wireless) to be combined into a single logical network. The result is a virtual LAN that can be administered like a physical local area network. In order to create a virtual LAN, the network equipment, such as routers and switches must support VLAN configuration. The hardware is typically configured using a software admin tool that allows the network administrator ... Read more

What is DHCP?

Stands for "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol." DHCP is a protocol that automatically assigns a unique IP address to each device that connects to a network. With DHCP, there is no need to manually assign IP addresses to new devices. Therefore, no user configuration is necessary to connect to a DCHP-based network. Because of its ease of use and widespread support, DHCP is the default protocol used by most routers and networking equipment. When you connect to a network, your device is considered a client and the router is the server. In order to successfully ... Read more
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